Ravelry made me do it!

A few weeks ago I was perusing the Rowan pages on Ravelry, and came across a discussion about discontinued yarns.  A number of Ravelers were expressing dismay over the discontinuation of Rowan’s Kidsilk Eclipse.  Regular readers will know that I am a big fan of Kidsilk, in all of its incarnations.  Here is one of my favorite projects ever, knit in Kidsilk Haze:

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And here is another, knit in Kidsilk Spray (now discontinued) for my lovely daughter, Emma:

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But I have had my head down lately, studying and working hard, and Kidsilk Eclipse has not hit my radar at all.  I had not even heard of it, and now it has been discontinued.

I then came across a comment from Leah, who writes the lovely knitting blog Fashion: Yarn Style.  She said:

“I have never seen anything to equal the gold shade of Kidsilk Haze eclipse! I am knitting a pullover in it right now, and every time I pull out my knitting a ton of people gather around! The yarn is that beautiful.”

I thought to myself “If Leah thinks it is beautiful and unique, then it must be true.”  I have absolute faith in Ravelers.  Then, I thought to myself “I wonder if I can still find any of it for sale here in the UK?”  The first site I found had sold out, but then I located some at Derramores.  And then, somehow, mysteriously, my credit card was in my hand, and I ordered a dozen balls!  How could that have happened?

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The yarn arrived and it is lovely and gossamer light.

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The colour is hard to describe.  The gold metallic thread is very gold and shiny, but only in certain lights; otherwise it is quite muted.  But the mohair thread is a lovely, pale champagne, more beige than gold, and provides enough subtlety for the gold to bounce off of.  It gets more beautiful, but also more interesting each time I look at it.

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Of course, one cannot receive 12 balls of Kidsilk, be it Haze or Eclipse, and not want to instantly cast on.  This is definitely going to slow down my progress on my Escher cardigan, but I plead knitigating circumstances here: Ravelry made me do it!

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Knitting, Interrupted

I have just finished up a few intense weeks of work and study in which there was no time for knitting.  I mean that in the broadest sense of the word.  It was for all intents and purposes a period of Knitting, Interrupted.  No knitting, no reading about knitting, no writing about knitting, no daydreaming about knitting.  Even in those moments when I was idle, I was too tired to move, much less knit.  My thanks to all those who left lovely comments on my last post and on Ravelry about my Lightweight Pullover; I was happy to read them.

Despite these past few weeks, I do have some knitting progress to share with you from before my knitting blackout.

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As you may recall, I had picked out my next project, the very cute and architectural cardigan called Escher, by Alexis Winslow for Brooklyn Tweed:

© Brooklyn Tweed/Jared Flood

© Brooklyn Tweed/Jared Flood

As with all projects, the first step was the swatch.  For this sweater, I needed to match a stockinette stitch gauge and a 2×2 ribbing gauge.  I started fooling around with some swatches very late (around midnight) on a Sunday evening.  I remember this because it was Superbowl Sunday, and here in the UK the coverage started around that time.  I also remember it because I had a question about the gauge and I wrote an email to pattern support at Brooklyn Tweed.  When I woke up the next morning, I discovered that my email had been answered within two hours of sending it, ON A SUNDAY, and DURING THE SUPERBOWL.  There is no denying that is exceptionally good service.

My question was: “How can you get the same gauge in rib with a smaller needle, than you get in stockinette with a larger needle?  This seems to me to be physically impossible:  ribbing always draws in the stitch count, even when blocked; knitting it with a smaller needle should make it even tighter.”

The answer was: “The ribbing is blocked more aggressively to achieve the same gauge as the stockinette stitch. The ribbing will be more flattened out than it normally is.”  Message to self:  Be more aggressive.

One of the more interesting features of this cardigan is the triangle at the back which is formed with short rows.  Here is a progress shot as I was starting the triangle:

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The short rows are interesting and the way they shape the fabric quite mesmerizing.  It is also pretty fast knitting.  A warning, however:  it is very easy to do the first side of the triangle, but you have to pay attention on the second.  I kept miscounting and had to rip back twice.  Finally, I marked each wrap-and-turn with a removable stitch marker so that I could see where I was.

In the Notebook section of the Brooklyn Tweed website, Jared Flood has a series of interviews with BT designers.  The interview with Alexis Winslow is really interesting and it has a lovely discussion of the design process behind Escher.  Alexis says:

“Escher was definitely a challenge for me. My original design concept didn’t have that beautiful V-shape–it was straight up and down like a stripe. I knitted the sample, and realized that I could achieve a much better fit if the armholes angled downward a bit. I went back to my sketchpad to work out solutions. There were a lot of different ways I could do this, but I decided the central triangle would be the most elegant way to solve this problem.”

from: Designer Conversations: Alexis Winslow; Brooklyn Tweed notebook (link above)

Please check out the interview.  I love that it shows some of Alexis’ sketches of the original design idea for Escher – before she added the triangle to the back.  Alexis has recently written her own post about this design, which you can find here, which has even more info on the design and its development.  She also has photos of it buttoned, which are missing from the Brooklyn Tweed shots.  Anyone interested in the design process or in this lovely garment should read these posts.

Here is the most current progress shot, taken this morning:

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I really love the way that the short rows change the direction of the knitting.  It makes the piece very striking and fluid.  I am nearly done with this portion of the cardigan and have come to the realization that two-thirds of this piece is ribbed.  If you don’t like ribbing, this may not be the project for you.  I am going to look at it philosophically: all of that aggressive blocking will help get rid of my frustrations.  First I’ll knit myself into a Zen-state, and then I’ll pin the crap out of it.  More proof of the health benefits of knitting!

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Turtleneck in Tart

Last week I finished knitting and blocked my turtleneck based on Hannah Fettig’s Lightweight Pullover pattern.  I then procrastinated for a week before weaving in the few ends.  Finally, this morning, I was able to wear it!

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I love how this turned out.  The fit is perfect.  This might be because I tried it on every few inches and knit it to fit.

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I mentioned in a previous post that I was considering making the seed stitch border at the hips a bit longer.  I ended up doing this, taking out the cast-off border and adding half an inch of seed stitch for a total of 2.5 inches.  The pattern calls for ribbing at the cuffs and hem, but I really like the look of the seed stitch; I think it gives the sweater a bit of a dressier line.

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I knit this with Madelinetosh Tosh Merino Light in Tart.  I wet blocked it, giving it a good soak.  I poured a cup of white vinegar in the water to help set the dye.  It definitely ran – if you are going to use Tart in colourwork I strongly recommend you wash all the dye out first.  I put it through a gentle spin cycle in the washer (inside a bag for delicate wash), and then laid it out to dry.  I didn’t need to pin it as the size was already perfect.  A warning, however, Tosh Merino Light does grow lengthwise after a soak – the sweater is two inches longer than pre-blocking.  Luckily, I was expecting this and the length came out perfectly.

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I am particularly pleased with the fit in the shoulder and arm.  I mentioned in a previous post that I didn’t follow the numbers in the pattern, but just winged all of the math.  This method works well when knitting top-down in the round since you can try it on as you go.

Most knitters will alternate skeins every row when using hand dyed yarn to avoid pooling.  It turns out that I am terrible at doing this when knitting in the round; the join always looks messy.  Besides that, it is awkward and I hate doing it.  For this sweater, I only alternated for an inch or so every time I joined a new colour.  I was lucky and didn’t get much pooling.

I love the fact that this sweater is so versatile.  I wore it above with dressy navy slacks and heels.  Here it is with a skirt.  (It would look better with a navy,brown or black skirt, but you get the idea.)

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Once I finished posing for the photos, however, how do you think I styled it?  Well, how else does one wear a jumper to go walking in the muddy English countryside?

Answer:

  1. You put your hair in a ponytail.
  2. You wear your wellies.  Wellies are essential; trust me.
  3. You borrow your husband’s way-too-big-on-you coat.  Why?  Why have a husband if you can’t wear his clothes?

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Now I’m off to find a muddy field to trek through….

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(By the way, I asked Doug to look at this post and he said “You should have named it Tart in Turtleneck instead of Turtleneck in Tart”.  He deserves to have his clothes stolen!)

Loft in the post

There are few things as cheering as yarn in the post.  Today, I received a package of Brooklyn Tweed Loft yarn in three rustic shades of grey.

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I am hours away from finishing my Lightweight Pullover.  Once it’s done, I will have only one – yes, just ONE – project in progress.  That one is the beautiful Exeter jacket which seems to be hibernating at the moment.  I love it, but I don’t feel like knitting it this winter, so I have put it away till next year.  As every knitter knows, it is an imperative to have a new project lined up before you finish with the old.  I simply cannot face the prospect of having no project on the needles. Therefore, I have been wracking my brain for weeks trying to come up with a new project or two.  I finally chose something.  Hence, the Loft:

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This beautiful pile of soft, wooly yarn is destined to become this:

© Brooklyn Tweed/Jared Flood

© Brooklyn Tweed/Jared Flood

This pattern is called Escher, and is designed by Alexis Winslow for Brooklyn Tweed; it appeared in their Wool People volume 8.  I love its unusual, funky construction.  Here is a shot of the back:

© Brooklyn Tweed/Jared Flood

© Brooklyn Tweed/Jared Flood

It was a rather compulsive purchase.  I have been considering many other patterns over the past few months.  I have looked at this one a number of times without it ever standing up and shouting “Knit me!”  But a few days ago, I came upon it again and it hit all of the right buttons.  I was looking for a lightweight cardigan that would fit well with my wardrobe.  I didn’t want something too warm as it is unlikely I will finish it before spring.  I wanted something interesting and fun to knit but not overly complicated.  I love the way this is styled in the photographs.  It looks new, stylish, slightly architectural, modern, but still cozy.  I love the soothing greys and the soft wool.

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I am so excited to have a new project ready to start!  Let’s just hope I have the fortitude to finish the turtleneck before I cast this on.

I will let you in on a secret: because one project is not enough, I have picked out another one too, which is as different from this one as day from night.  The yarn is being hand-dyed to order and won’t get to me for a while so you will have to be patient.

Pattern, recipe or inspiration?

I have been thinking lately about how we use knitting patterns; they can be used as a pattern, a recipe or an inspiration.  These terms represent points on a continuum and thus can be rather fluid.  Two questions particularly interest me:

  1. What are the boundaries or tipping points?  For example, when does a pattern become an inspiration?  How much do you have to personalize a pattern before it becomes something else?
  2. How does one appropriately attribute those projects that fall on the boundaries?

Part of the reason I am thinking about this now is because of the project I am currently working on.  I am knitting a turtleneck pullover with Madelinetosh Tosh Merino Light in Tart.  I usually start a project by picking a pattern that appeals and then finding the yarn.  In this case, I started with the yarn – 4 skeins of the Tart – and a gap in my wardrobe.  Specifically, because I’ve put on some weight, all of my pullovers are too tight and too short.  I wanted a pullover that fit properly and that could be dressed up or down.  I wanted it to look good at the office with a pencil skirt or out hiking with my jeans and boots.  I spent some time (I will admit – I spent a lot of time) pouring over patterns and finally came up with the Lightweight Pullover by Hannah Fettig.  Here is the pattern photo:

copyright Quince & Co

copyright Quince & Co

It’s hard to tell from the photo but the waistband is ribbed as are the sleeve cuffs.  I am not quite finished with mine – the body is knit but one sleeve is about half done, and the other about a third done.  If you look at the most current progress photo below, you can see that mine doesn’t really look that much like the pattern photo.

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Part of this is for obvious reasons – mine has less ease, more fitted sleeves, is longer, and the waistband is in seed stitch instead of rib.  The choice of yarn also changes the look of the sweater quite a bit – the Madelinetosh Light doesn’t have the halo of the angora blend called for in the pattern.  But as it turns out, the reasons for my pondering have more to do with how I used the pattern – namely, not much at all.

Let me be specific.  I choose the pattern and then I bought the pattern.  I decided which size to knit, looked at the pattern and it said to cast on x-many stitches and knit 9 inches for the turtleneck before starting raglan increases.  I cast on the stitches and knit 9 inches and started raglan increases.  But, here is the crucial bit – since looking at the pattern initially to see how the turtleneck was made, I have not looked at it again.  The truth is that the pattern is for a very basic raglan construction, and I don’t need a pattern to make a raglan sweater.  What I do is try the thing on frequently, look at it critically in the mirror and decide what needs to be done.  Is it the right length to divide off the sleeves?  Do I need more waist decreases?  Where is my natural waist?  Does it flare enough over the hips?  It doesn’t occur to me to check the pattern because I am making it to fit ME and to please ME and I have two eyes and can see how it fits and adjust it accordingly.

I am pretty sure that my sweater is between the sizes offered by the pattern though I haven’t checked.  The seed stitch, too, is an innovation.  When I was knitting the body of the sweater I was in South Africa.  I didn’t bring the pattern with me and had limited access to the internet.  I couldn’t recall what the original pattern looked like, but decided that I would make a turned hem because I wanted a neater, more professional look for the sweater – so that it had a bit more polish, like a blouse.  After agonizing over it for a while, I decided to knit an inch or two of seed stitch as an experiment and see what I thought.  As it turns out, I liked it so it stayed.  (Now that I’ve seen the progress photos, I’m thinking of going back and adding another inch of seed stitch at the hips.)

Hannah Fettig is a very popular designer whose patterns are extremely well-written. Hannah was at the leading end of a recent trend towards finer-gauged yarns in sweaters.  She has a perfect eye and many of her designs are on my wish list.  Some of them are very unique and clever, and others are extremely well-executed classics.  This one falls into the latter category and is why I felt confident doing it my way.

Now let’s look at the question of attribution.  On Ravelry, you link to the pattern page for any pattern you use.  At some point not too long ago, Ravelry realized that many people incorporated certain parts of patterns into a finished piece, or merged two or more patterns into one.  They introduced an option: one can either link to a pattern (thus essentially saying “I knit this pattern”) or one can say that the project “incorporates” a pattern (thus saying “I used bits or pieces of this pattern within another pattern”).  When I started the project entry for my turtleneck, I linked to Hannah’s pattern.  At some point, I started to think that perhaps my project deviates from the original enough to say that it “incorporates” the Lightweight Pullover pattern.  I actually changed the Ravelry entry, changing the Name of the project to “Turtle in Tart” and acknowledging Hannah’s pattern using the “incorporates” option.  I also included notes to outline how I made it, so that someone can replicate it if they wish.   To refer back to the title of this post, I essentially moved it from pattern, to either recipe or inspiration.  I must admit to being undecided about this – I have changed it back and forth a few times in the last few days, and it is likely to end up linked as pattern.

Let’s take another example, which I think contrasts quite well with this one.  In the spring of 2013, I knit the following sweater:

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The pattern I used was called Livvy, designed by Tori Gurbisz.  Here is the pattern photo for Tori’s design:

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As you can see, I changed this pattern as well.  I detailed all of the changes I made on this blog.   I made it much shorter, put in hems at the hip and cuffs, and made the sweater curvier, with more negative ease built in but also more pairs of waist decreases.  I think that my Livvy looks dramatically different from the pattern – much more so than my Lightweight Pullover looks from its pattern.  In fact, the types of changes I made are very similar in both sweaters – changing the length, the ease, and the sleeve cuffs and bottom edgings.   However, it would never have occurred to me to use an “incorporates” option in Tori’s pattern.  This is partly because Livvy has some very unique features, which I have utilized, which are instantly identifiable as Livvy.   So why have I wavered about the attribution of one and not the other?

On reflection, the underlying difference between these two cases has to do with the math.  To make the Livvy sweater, I used all of Tori’s numbers as a basis for my own calculations.  In knitting the Turtle in Tart, I didn’t use Hannah’s numbers, essentially ignoring all of the math and calculating my own numbers as I knit.  Thus the former “feels” like I followed a pattern and the latter doesn’t. Looking at the photos, you can see that the end results are very similar – a project based on a lovely pattern that has been “tweaked” to fit my curvier body and my style.  The only real difference is whether I used the numbers or not.   But perhaps this distinction is odd or outmoded.  Is it math that makes the pattern?  Or is it vision?  And, if it’s math, does it still “count” the same now that most numbers are generated by software?  I don’t think there is any right answer here.  (I suspect that both math and vision count, though, depending on the sweater, and perhaps on the knitter, one may be more dominant than the other.)   Many knitters are now using Amy Herzog’s CustomFit, in which they can basically input specifics of a pattern they like and it will generate the maths specifically for their body.  The resulting project is usually attributed to both the original pattern and the CustomFit programme.  (CustomFit also generates a selection of “classic” designs to fit.)   To me the important facts for my two projects discussed here are that (1) I paid for both patterns, and (2) I acknowledged both designers.

There are many related issues I haven’t even begun to get into here, and I have been trying to keep to the issue of how patterns are used, and where one draws the line between following a pattern, using it as a recipe, or being inspired by one.  (That said, I recently came across a funny case.  Someone had seen a sweater worn by a certain celebrity baby, and reverse-engineered it.  She then “published” the pattern.  Later, she became incensed that other knitters were knitting the sweater without attributing her pattern.  Someone asked, very reasonably and politely, why she believed that no one else would be able to reverse-engineer it as well.  After all, if she had done it, thousands of other knitters could have as well.  She responded – in an increasingly snippy and clueless way – that there was no need for anyone else to reverse-engineer it because she had already done so! She was completely unable to see that someone else could have knit it without using her pattern, or that someone might not have seen or had access to her pattern.  I must admit to finding the discussion fascinating.)

What do you think?  When is a pattern not a pattern?  Does it matter?  Is anyone else fascinated by these types of questions?  Have I been adversely affected by writing a philosophy grant this week?  Can I use British spelling conventions and still say “math”?  Maybe I should get to work on those sleeves…..

Suddenly Soumak

I have finished the gorgeous Soumak Wrap and am totally in love.

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This wrap was designed by the super-talented Lisa Richardson of Rowan Yarn.  I met her when I was at Rowan last week, but unfortunately I was just 5 days short of finishing. The pattern is called the Soumak Scarf Wrap and was published in Rowan 54.  It is also available online for free; follow the link from the Ravelry page here.  Rowan 54 is a terrific volume, however, so don’t be afraid to splurge for the magazine.)

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I love everything about this Wrap.  Most especially I love the colours.  They are so rich and deep, and they change according to the light or the background.

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I also like that I wouldn’t have picked this palette of colours myself.  This allows me to push my boundaries a little bit and open up to new colours and combinations.  One of the bonuses of the pattern, to my mind, is that the back of the fabric is nearly as cool as the front, and the juxtaposition of the two is fabulous.

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The title of this post, Suddenly Soumak, is a bit of a joke.  I have had the song Suddenly Seymour from the Little Shop of Horrors in my head the last few weeks (and the play on it, Suddenly New Zealand, by the cabaret group Fascinating Aida).  As I was blocking this, the song was running through my head and morphed into Suddenly Soumak.  The joke is on me in this case:  I started knitting this in September 2013!!!!  It took me 16 months to knit.

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Notice to anyone lusting after this pattern: it does not take anywhere near 16 months to knit, unless, like me, you have problems with knitting project monogamy.  (In those 16 months, I also knit 3 sweaters, six cowls, four pairs of fingerless mitts, a skirt, and – please forgive the lack of humility here –  the world’s most fabulous Tolkien-inspired birthday present.)  Now I am kicking myself for dawdling, because this is one of the best things I have ever knit and I want to wear it every day.  It is also quite easy to knit, so do not have any fear: cast it on immediately and you will never be sorry.

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I knit this according to the pattern, with the exact colours and colour repeat sequence. The only changes are that I went down a needle size, and I knit only 7 repeats instead of 8. Therein lies another part of the “Suddenly Soumak” joke: I kept knitting and knitting and  I never seemed to get near the end of this project.   I finished 7 repeats and I still had one more to go and I was losing momentum.  Then for the first time I measured it, and discovered that it was already longer than needed.  I bound it off quickly, blocked it, and – suddenly Soumak was done.

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For those who like to know these things – the unblocked measurements were 16″x71″ and the blocked measurements are 19″x77″.  As you can see, it is quite long:

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I cannot end this post without gushing about the yarn.  I love Rowan Fine Tweed.  I knit one project with it before, the Peerie Flooers hat designed by Kate Davies, which like Soumak utilizes many colours in the design.   A really good tweed yarn needs to have a beautiful, rich, heathered background colour, and then very bold, contrasting flecks. Rowan Tweed does this perfectly – there is not a single shade that I do not covet.  When washed, it becomes bouncy and squishy, with a fabulous loft – really airy and plush while still being warm.  But the absolute best part, particularly after all of the hand-dyed yarns I have used lately: there are ten colours in this wrap, and when I washed it, not a single one ran.  I love the fact that I can do intricate colourwork with this yarn and don’t have to worry about colour bleeding or pooling.  I can see a lot of Rowan Fine Tweed in my future!

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In which our heroine travels to Rowan Yarn Headquarters and has a breakdown

This is the story of how I went to Rowan Yarns and had a breakdown.  On Friday, Doug and I drove up to Holmfirth, in West Yorkshire.  Holmfirth is apparently famous as the site of a well known British sitcom, The Last of the Summer Wine, which ran for 30 seasons!  I must admit that, until this weekend, I had never heard of the show.  To me, and perhaps to knitters everywhere, Holmfirth is famous for one thing and one thing alone: it is the home of Rowan Yarn.

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As many of you know, I am busy studying for an Executive MBA.  For each module in the programme, I am required to write a paper.  For each paper, I have dutifully written about higher education, because that is the industry I work in.  I yearned, however, to focus my efforts for at least one module on the subject I love best: knitting.  Thus the trip to Rowan.  I am writing a paper on Rowan Yarn for my Strategic Marketing module.  Friday we drove up so I could meet with Karl Hallam, their Global Digital Marketing Director (thank you to the lovely Dayana, a fellow knitting blogger and Rowan Ambassador, for putting me in touch with Karl!).

I had a fantastic time.  Karl toured me around the whole place, and was willing to accomodate all of my oohs and aahs, and my need to touch everything.  He introduced me to everyone.  He answered all of my questions (there were a lot of them)!  He spent three hours with me and never made me feel that he needed to be elsewhere.  He very knowledgeably discussed marketing, and the yarn industry, and shared his experience with me.  I was quite impressed with what his small team have accomplished.

Here is me in front of the wall of covers:

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Here is the warehouse.  This yarn is not for sending out to customers; this yarn is here for designers to play with while they are knitting swatches and letting the designs percolate in their brains.  I am definitely in the wrong profession.

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Hey look!  I found the Kid Silk Haze.  Instantly.  It’s as if I had an internal Kid Silk Haze detecting device.

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When I left, Karl gave me a Rowan goodie bag!!!!  Let’s put this into perspective: When I interviewed the Vice Chancellor of the university for a paper on Strategy, did I receive a goodie bag?  NO.  When I interviewed sector analysts for a paper on International Business and Higher Education, did I receive a goodie bag?  NO. When I interviewed the University’s Head of Human Services for a paper on People Management, did I receive a goodie bag?  NO.  Yarn is the best industry in the world.  They give goodie bags.  I rest my case.

Am I going to tell you what was in my goodie bag?  No!  Why not?  Because it was full of yarn and Rowan Publications that had NOT YET BEEN LAUNCHED!!!!!  Oh, be still my heart!  (But, just so you know, Rowan 57 is a knock-out!  Trust me.)

We stayed overnight in Holmfirth at a B&B (the Old Bridge Inn).  It was very nice, but the weather was terrible.  A storm front with freezing temperatures and gale-force winds had moved in.  There were lashings of rain, the kind that is icy and just on the verge of snow.  The next morning, given the weather, we decided to head straight home and not mosey along exploring the area.  The car was behaving strangely as well; we didn’t seem to have much oomph.  Just as we hit the M1, the car died (literally).  Doug very calmly announced “We don’t have any power.  It’s not responding to the accelerator” and deftly managed to get us over to the shoulder of the road.  (Note to readers: I would not have been calm in this circumstance.)

A call to AA said that help was on the way, but that we shouldn’t sit in the car; it was too dangerous.  I opened the door to get out of the car and was nearly blown away by the force of the wind.  This was the start of a very long and cold day (despite the absolutely brilliant service of AA).

A tow truck came and towed us to the nearest highway rest stop, where I sat down at a Starbucks and waited for 4 hours.  Doug had quite a separate adventure during this period – the AA repairman was sure the car was fixable with a few extra parts, so he and Doug drove off to a parts shop and spent time in the dreadful wind and cold changing spark plugs and coils and other such things.  Meanwhile, what did I do stuck in a cold highway services Starbucks for 4 hours?  Well, I had my knitting with me (but of course).  And what knitting did I have with me but the Soumak Wrap which was within ten hours or so of finishing!  And when my fingers got too cold to knit – I had a GOODIE BAG filled with as-yet unreleased Rowan pattern magazines!

We eventually made it home.  A lovely AA repariman drove us (all crammed into the front seat) to a local airport where we could rent a car for the drive home.  Our car was loaded on a tow truck and eventually made it to the local garage down the street from our house.  I very nearly finished knitting the Soumak Wrap.  And that is the story of how I went to Rowan Yarns and had a breakdown!

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